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Pharma Company Disclosures

The companies below disclose financial relationships with physicians, and sometimes other health providers. Most of these companies (or one of their subsidiaries) are required to disclose under corporate integrity agreements with the Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. We are displaying what companies currently disclose. Beginning in 2014, under the Physician Payment Sunshine Act, every pharmaceutical and medical device company will be required to report payments of $10 or more to the federal government.

Company Required to Disclose? First Disclosure
Year
Speaking fees
Consulting fees
Research
Travel fees
Meals
Educational Items/Gifts
Royalty or License Fees
AbbVie x 2012
Allergan x 2010
AstraZeneca x 2010
Cephalon x 2009
Eli Lilly x 2009
EMD Serono x 2011
Forest x 2012
GlaxoSmithKline * 2009
Johnson & Johnson x 2010
Merck * 2009
Novartis x 2010
Pfizer x 2009
UCB x 2012
Valeant x 2010
ViiV 2010

Notes:

  • GlaxoSmithKline and Merck began disclosing voluntarily in 2009 but later agreed to do so as a condition of a legal settlement with the U.S. government.
  • AbbVie combines all categories into a single amount and does not break out specific spending on each category.
  • Allergan first reported payments in 2010 but later removed some payments from its website. Those payments are not included in this database. Allergan also reports in ranges and does not break out specific spending on each category.
  • Cephalon pulled its disclosures offline earlier this year because its Corporate Integrity Agreement with the HHS inspector general expired last year. The data on this site reflects payments disclosed from 2009 to 2012.
  • Johnson & Johnson's report includes the payments disclosed separately by four of its subsidiaries. They release information on different schedules.
  • Lilly combines business travel and educational items/gifts in one category and does not break apart the value of each.
  • Merck combines travel, meals and royalties into one category and does not break apart the value of each.
  • Novartis changed its reporting period from fiscal year to calendar year, so there is no data displayed for Q4 2011.
  • UCB combines all categories into a single amount and does not break out specific spending on each category.