ProPublica

Tracking Evictions and Rent Stabilization in NYC

How Many Eviction Cases Did Your Landlord Bring and What Protections Might You Have?

Since 1994, the City Council and state legislature have gradually dismantled legal protections for New York City tenants, giving landlords an incentive to hike rents and evict lower-income tenants. We’ve mapped more than 450,000 New York City eviction cases filed between January 2013 and June 2015. Look up your building to see its recent eviction cases and whether it may be rent stabilized. Related Story »

Source: Evictions data from the New York City Public Advocate’s Office. Rent stabilization data derived from the New York City Department of Finance and taxbills.nyc. Building footprints from NYC OpenData. Additional property data provided by Rentlogic.

Additional analysis by Stephen Werner.

Methodology: We geocoded eviction petitions to include property identifiers used by New York City's finance and building departments. We then used those identifiers to link the data to additional information about each property where an eviction was filed, such as its age, size, building classification, tax benefits, owners and officers. To limit our results to eviction cases filed in private residential buildings, we removed public property owners, such as the New York City Housing Authority. We also removed commercial and industrial properties as identified by New York City Dept. of City Planning Land Use Categories.

Note: Because of small discrepancies between city agencies’ data, in less than 1 percent of buildings, actual eviction case counts are higher than shown.

Source: Evictions data from the New York City Public Advocate’s Office. Rent stabilization data derived from the New York City Department of Finance and taxbills.nyc. Building footprints from NYC OpenData. Additional property data provided by Rentlogic.

Additional analysis by Stephen Werner.

Methodology: We geocoded eviction petitions to include property identifiers used by New York City's finance and building departments. We then used those identifiers to link the data to additional information about each property where an eviction was filed, such as its age, size, building classification, tax benefits, owners and officers. To limit our results to eviction cases filed in private residential buildings, we removed public property owners, such as the New York City Housing Authority. We also removed commercial and industrial properties as identified by New York City Dept. of City Planning Land Use Categories.

Note: Because of small discrepancies between city agencies’ data, in less than 1 percent of buildings, actual eviction case counts are higher than shown.

Number of evictions

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300+