Lobbying Relationship

Client

National Association of Chemical Distributors

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Lobbying firm

National Association of Chemical Distributors

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  • Superfund Excise Tax Full or Partial Repeal - Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act reinstatement of the Superfund excise tax led to NACD advocating for full or partial repeal of the Superfund excise tax. Additionally, NACD advocated for Congress to put pressure on the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Department of Treasury to issue additional guidance on the excise tax due to unclear initial guidance that left taxpayers guessing as to what should be taxed. The Superfund Tax on chemicals was sold as a fee on chemicals, but it is really a new tax on consumers. The 42 chemicals identified for taxation are the building blocks for a limitless number of goods, including steel, plastics, wood products, copper, cement, glass, pesticides, fungicides, pharmaceuticals, rubber, paint and coatings, batteries, solar panels, soap and detergents, ceramics, textiles, semiconductors, water treatment, light bulbs, refrigerants, dental fillings, fireworks and consumer electronics. The Superfund Tax on chemicals will also impede the goals of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework by making the components of infrastructure more expensive-including clean energy building blocks such as renewable energy, advanced coatings, energy efficiency solutions and electric vehicle (EV) infrastructure. The Superfund Tax on chemicals will also make U.S. manufacturers less competitive. NACD advocated for full repeal of the Superfund Tax in 2022, as well as partial repeal/exclusion of certain specific chemicals not manufactured in the US. While we awaited more information from the IRS, Congress passed the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022, which reinstated the Hazardous Substance Superfund Financing Tax Rate on Crude Oil and Petroleum Products. The tax will go into effect on January 1, 2023, and will be applied upon importation of the petroleum products. This additional component of the Superfund Tax will have an impact on NACD members, in addition to the initial resurrection of Part 1 of the Superfund Tax. NACD engaged in congressional advocacy to eliminate or limit the scope of the Superfund tax, including working with representatives and senators to send letters to Treasury/IRS, and educating offices on key committees about our compliance challenges. NACD advocated against legislation that would impose blanket bans of Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) class of chemicals. NACD advocated in support of S. 576, the Railway Safety Act of 2023, introduced by Sens. Sherrod Brown (D-OH), J.D. Vance (R-OH), Bob Casey (D-PA), and John Fetterman (D-PA), Marco Rubio (R-FL), and Josh Hawley (R-MO) on March 1, 2023, following the train derailment in East Palestine, OH. NACD also supported and advocated in favor of the House of Representatives companion bill, H.R. 1674, introduced by Reps. Chris Deluzio (D-PA) and Nick LaLota (R-NY) on March 21, 2023. This bill addresses safety requirements for rail carriers and trains transporting hazardous materials. Specifically, the Department of Transportation (DOT) must issue safety regulations for trains carrying hazardous materials to require that rail carriers or shippers (1) provide state emergency response commissioners with advanced notice and information about the hazardous materials; (2) reduce blocked rail crossings; and (3) comply with certain requirements regarding train length and weight specifications, track standards, speed restrictions, and response plans. DOT must also establish requirements for wayside defect detectors. These are used by railway systems alongside the tracks to detect defects and failures (e.g., wheel bearing failures). Current federal regulations do not require their use, but federal guidance does address their placement and use. Under the bill, DOT must issue regulations establishing requirements for the installation, repair, testing, maintenance, and operation of wayside defect detectors for each rail carrier operating a train carrying hazardous materials. The bill also 1)increases the maximum fines DOT may impose on rail carriers for violating safety regulations, 2) requires DOT to update rail car inspection regulations and audit the federal inspection program, 3) requires a minimum two-person crew for certain freight trains, 4) phases out certain railroad tank cars by May 1, 2025 (four years sooner than required under current law), 5) expands training for local first responders, 6) imposes a new fee on certain rail carriers, and 7) provides funding for research and development to improve railway safety. - The Senate bill, S.576, passed out the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation (as an amendment in nature of a substitute) by a vote of 16-11, and now awaits a full Senate vote. - NACD highlighted the numerous ongoing rail safety issues and initiatives to help bolster the bill text. NACD advocated for minor changes to the bill text to ensure provisions help to resolve the actual safety issues the railroads need to address to bolster rail safety. - NACD's concern with this legislation was providing legislative text that ensures the required advanced notices and information about the presence of hazardous materials onboard the rail is kept strictly between those with a need-to-know (i.e. first responders, state emergency response commissioners, state/local authorities), and not the general public. Additionally, the onus of sharing this information be on the rail carrier, and not the shippers, because shippers do not have that information to share. NACD advocated in support of H.R. 1633, the Reducing Accidents in Locomotives (RAIL) Act, introduced by Reps. Bill Johnson (R-OH) and Emilia Strong Sykes (D-OH) in the House of Representatives. This legislation is a bipartisan product that aims to enhance safety requirements for trains transporting hazardous materials. The RAIL Act would improve railway safety and operations by 1) directing the Federal Rail Administration (FRA), in conjunction with the findings of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation, to recommend changes to how our nations rail system operates - from train length, weight to speed, and track standards, 2) increasing funding for Hazardous Materials Training for first responders, 3) increasing maximum penalties for violations of rail safety regulations, 4) increasing inspections on all trains, including those carrying hazardous materials, 5) auditing federal rail inspection programs.
  • NACD advocated for legislation to be introduced that provides long-term reauthorization of the Department of Homeland Security's Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) program, administered by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, before the program sunsets on July 27, 2023. This advocacy was to intended educate Congress on the CFATS program and to bring awareness to the impending expiration of the program in July 2023. NACD worked to educate members of key congressional committees in the new Congress about the importance of the program and is seeking several avenues to ensure the swift and timely reauthorization of CFATS. The committees of jurisdiction are the House Committee on Homeland Security, House Committee on Energy & Commerce, and the Senate Committee on Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs. No legislation has been introduced to-date. NACD advocated in support of S. 576, the Railway Safety Act of 2023, introduced by Sens. Sherrod Brown (D-OH), J.D. Vance (R-OH), Bob Casey (D-PA), and John Fetterman (D-PA), Marco Rubio (R-FL), and Josh Hawley (R-MO) on March 1, 2023, following the train derailment in East Palestine, OH. NACD also supported and advocated in favor of the House of Representatives companion bill, H.R. 1674, introduced by Reps. Chris Deluzio (D-PA) and Nick LaLota (R-NY) on March 21, 2023. This bill addresses safety requirements for rail carriers and trains transporting hazardous materials. Specifically, the Department of Transportation (DOT) must issue safety regulations for trains carrying hazardous materials to require that rail carriers or shippers (1) provide state emergency response commissioners with advanced notice and information about the hazardous materials; (2) reduce blocked rail crossings; and (3) comply with certain requirements regarding train length and weight specifications, track standards, speed restrictions, and response plans. DOT must also establish requirements for wayside defect detectors. These are used by railway systems alongside the tracks to detect defects and failures (e.g., wheel bearing failures). Current federal regulations do not require their use, but federal guidance does address their placement and use. Under the bill, DOT must issue regulations establishing requirements for the installation, repair, testing, maintenance, and operation of wayside defect detectors for each rail carrier operating a train carrying hazardous materials. The bill also 1)increases the maximum fines DOT may impose on rail carriers for violating safety regulations, 2) requires DOT to update rail car inspection regulations and audit the federal inspection program, 3) requires a minimum two-person crew for certain freight trains, 4) phases out certain railroad tank cars by May 1, 2025 (four years sooner than required under current law), 5) expands training for local first responders, 6) imposes a new fee on certain rail carriers, and 7) provides funding for research and development to improve railway safety. - The Senate bill, S.576, passed out the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation (as an amendment in nature of a substitute) by a vote of 16-11, and now awaits a full Senate vote. - NACD highlighted the numerous ongoing rail safety issues and initiatives to help bolster the bill text. NACD advocated for minor changes to the bill text to ensure provisions help to resolve the actual safety issues the railroads need to address to bolster rail safety. - NACD's concern with this legislation was providing legislative text that ensures the required advanced notices and information about the presence of hazardous materials onboard the rail is kept strictly between those with a need-to-know (i.e. first responders, state emergency response commissioners, state/local authorities), and not the general public. Additionally, the onus of sharing this information be on the rail carrier, and not the shippers, because shippers do not have that information to share. NACD advocated in support of H.R. 1633, the Reducing Accidents in Locomotives (RAIL) Act, introduced by Reps. Bill Johnson (R-OH) and Emilia Strong Sykes (D-OH) in the House of Representatives. This legislation is a bipartisan product that aims to enhance safety requirements for trains transporting hazardous materials. The RAIL Act would improve railway safety and operations by 1) directing the Federal Rail Administration (FRA), in conjunction with the findings of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation, to recommend changes to how our nations rail system operates - from train length, weight to speed, and track standards, 2) increasing funding for Hazardous Materials Training for first responders, 3) increasing maximum penalties for violations of rail safety regulations, 4) increasing inspections on all trains, including those carrying hazardous materials, 5) auditing federal rail inspection programs. No additional action on this bill to-date in the House. Superfund Excise Tax Full or Partial Repeal - Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act reinstatement of the Superfund excise tax led to NACD advocating for full or partial repeal of the Superfund excise tax. Additionally, NACD advocated for Congress to put pressure on the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Department of Treasury to issue additional guidance on the excise tax due to unclear initial guidance that left taxpayers guessing as to what should be taxed. The Superfund Tax on chemicals was sold as a fee on chemicals, but it is really a new tax on consumers. The 42 chemicals identified for taxation are the building blocks for a limitless number of goods, including steel, plastics, wood products, copper, cement, glass, pesticides, fungicides, pharmaceuticals, rubber, paint and coatings, batteries, solar panels, soap and detergents, ceramics, textiles, semiconductors, water treatment, light bulbs, refrigerants, dental fillings, fireworks and consumer electronics. The Superfund Tax on chemicals will also impede the goals of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework by making the components of infrastructure more expensive-including clean energy building blocks such as renewable energy, advanced coatings, energy efficiency solutions and electric vehicle (EV) infrastructure. The Superfund Tax on chemicals will also make U.S. manufacturers less competitive. NACD advocated for full repeal of the Superfund Tax in 2022, as well as partial repeal/exclusion of certain specific chemicals not manufactured in the US. While we awaited more information from the IRS, Congress passed the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022, which reinstated the Hazardous Substance Superfund Financing Tax Rate on Crude Oil and Petroleum Products. The tax will go into effect on January 1, 2023, and will be applied upon importation of the petroleum products. This additional component of the Superfund Tax will have an impact on NACD members, in addition to the initial resurrection of Part 1 of the Superfund Tax. NACD engaged in congressional advocacy to eliminate or limit the scope of the Superfund tax, including working with representatives and senators to send letters to Treasury/IRS, and educating offices on key committees about our compliance challenges. NACD advocated against legislation that would impose blanket bans of Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) class of chemicals.
  • NACD advocated in support of S. 576, the Railway Safety Act of 2023, introduced by Sens. Sherrod Brown (D-OH), J.D. Vance (R-OH), Bob Casey (D-PA), and John Fetterman (D-PA), Marco Rubio (R-FL), and Josh Hawley (R-MO) on March 1, 2023, following the train derailment in East Palestine, OH. NACD also supported and advocated in favor of the House of Representatives companion bill, H.R. 1674, introduced by Reps. Chris Deluzio (D-PA) and Nick LaLota (R-NY) on March 21, 2023. This bill addresses safety requirements for rail carriers and trains transporting hazardous materials. Specifically, the Department of Transportation (DOT) must issue safety regulations for trains carrying hazardous materials to require that rail carriers or shippers (1) provide state emergency response commissioners with advanced notice and information about the hazardous materials; (2) reduce blocked rail crossings; and (3) comply with certain requirements regarding train length and weight specifications, track standards, speed restrictions, and response plans. DOT must also establish requirements for wayside defect detectors. These are used by railway systems alongside the tracks to detect defects and failures (e.g., wheel bearing failures). Current federal regulations do not require their use, but federal guidance does address their placement and use. Under the bill, DOT must issue regulations establishing requirements for the installation, repair, testing, maintenance, and operation of wayside defect detectors for each rail carrier operating a train carrying hazardous materials. The bill also 1)increases the maximum fines DOT may impose on rail carriers for violating safety regulations, 2) requires DOT to update rail car inspection regulations and audit the federal inspection program, 3) requires a minimum two-person crew for certain freight trains, 4) phases out certain railroad tank cars by May 1, 2025 (four years sooner than required under current law), 5) expands training for local first responders, 6) imposes a new fee on certain rail carriers, and 7) provides funding for research and development to improve railway safety. - The Senate bill, S.576, passed out the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation (as an amendment in nature of a substitute) by a vote of 16-11, and now awaits a full Senate vote. - NACD highlighted the numerous ongoing rail safety issues and initiatives to help bolster the bill text. NACD advocated for minor changes to the bill text to ensure provisions help to resolve the actual safety issues the railroads need to address to bolster rail safety. - NACD's concern with this legislation was providing legislative text that ensures the required advanced notices and information about the presence of hazardous materials onboard the rail is kept strictly between those with a need-to-know (i.e. first responders, state emergency response commissioners, state/local authorities), and not the general public. Additionally, the onus of sharing this information be on the rail carrier, and not the shippers, because shippers do not have that information to share. NACD advocated in support of H.R. 1633, the Reducing Accidents in Locomotives (RAIL) Act, introduced by Reps. Bill Johnson (R-OH) and Emilia Strong Sykes (D-OH) in the House of Representatives. This legislation is a bipartisan product that aims to enhance safety requirements for trains transporting hazardous materials. The RAIL Act would improve railway safety and operations by 1) directing the Federal Rail Administration (FRA), in conjunction with the findings of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation, to recommend changes to how our nations rail system operates - from train length, weight to speed, and track standards, 2) increasing funding for Hazardous Materials Training for first responders, 3) increasing maximum penalties for violations of rail safety regulations, 4) increasing inspections on all trains, including those carrying hazardous materials, 5) auditing federal rail inspection programs. No additional action on this bill to-date in the House. NACD advocated in support of including additional paid sick days in any legislated rail labor legislation moving forward. NACD advocated for the inclusion of chemical distribution facilities in the definition of covered critical infrastructure as it relates to drone policy.
  • The Generalized System of Preferences (GSP), a tariff relief program, expired on December 31, 2020. The GSP, established by the Trade Act of 1974, provides duty relief on products from participating developing countries to promote economic development. NACD supports either a short-term renewal with a clean extension of the program while negotiations continue or a long-term retroactive renewal of GSP. Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB) - The Miscellaneous Tariff Bill, also a tariff relief program, expired on December 31, 2020. The MTB is a trade program facilitated by the U.S. International Trade Commission that provides duty relief on imports that cannot be domestically produced. NACD supported the retroactive renewal of the MTB. China Section 301 tariffs - USTR has implemented three China import tariff lists. List 1 and 2 remain in effect, and List 3 has been projected to go from 10% to 25%. NACD supports legislation to remove these import tariffs. Superfund Excise Tax Full or Partial Repeal - Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act reinstatement of the Superfund excise tax led to NACD advocating for full or partial repeal of the Superfund excise tax. Additionally, NACD advocated for Congress to put pressure on the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Department of Treasury to issue additional guidance on the excise tax due to unclear initial guidance that left taxpayers guessing as to what should be taxed. The Superfund Tax on chemicals was sold as a fee on chemicals, but it is really a new tax on consumers. The 42 chemicals identified for taxation are the building blocks for a limitless number of goods, including steel, plastics, wood products, copper, cement, glass, pesticides, fungicides, pharmaceuticals, rubber, paint and coatings, batteries, solar panels, soap and detergents, ceramics, textiles, semiconductors, water treatment, light bulbs, refrigerants, dental fillings, fireworks and consumer electronics. The Superfund Tax on chemicals will also impede the goals of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework by making the components of infrastructure more expensive-including clean energy building blocks such as renewable energy, advanced coatings, energy efficiency solutions and electric vehicle (EV) infrastructure. The Superfund Tax on chemicals will also make U.S. manufacturers less competitive. NACD advocated for full repeal of the Superfund Tax in 2022, as well as partial repeal/exclusion of certain specific chemicals not manufactured in the US. While we awaited more information from the IRS, Congress passed the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022, which reinstated the Hazardous Substance Superfund Financing Tax Rate on Crude Oil and Petroleum Products. The tax will go into effect on January 1, 2023, and will be applied upon importation of the petroleum products. This additional component of the Superfund Tax will have an impact on NACD members, in addition to the initial resurrection of Part 1 of the Superfund Tax. NACD engaged in congressional advocacy to eliminate or limit the scope of the Superfund tax, including working with representatives and senators to send letters to Treasury/IRS, and educating offices on key committees about our compliance challenges.
  • NACD advocated for legislation to be introduced that provides long-term reauthorization of the Department of Homeland Security's Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) program, administered by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, before the program sunsets on July 27, 2023. This advocacy was to intended educate Congress on the CFATS program and to bring awareness to the impending expiration of the program in July 2023. NACD worked to educate members of key congressional committees in the new Congress about the importance of the program and is seeking several avenues to ensure the swift and timely reauthorization of CFATS. The committees of jurisdiction are the House Committee on Homeland Security, House Committee on Energy & Commerce, and the Senate Committee on Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs. No legislation has been introduced to-date. NACD advocated for the strengthening of cybersecurity for critical infrastructure through a public-private partnership that has liability protections for the private sector. NACD advocated for the inclusion of chemical distribution facilities in the definition of covered critical infrastructure as it relates to drone policy.
  • NACD advocates in opposition to the companion legislation H.R.20/S.567, the Richard L. Trumka Protecting the Right to Organize Act of 2023. H.R.20 was introduced on February 28, 2023, by Rep. Bobby Scott (D-VA-03), and S.567 was introduced on February 28, 2023, by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT). This bill expands various labor protections related to employees' rights to organize and collectively bargain in the workplace. Specifically, it revises the definitions of employee, supervisor, and employer to broaden the scope of individuals covered by the fair labor standards; permits labor organizations to encourage the participation of union members in strikes initiated by employees represented by a different labor organization (i.e., secondary strikes); and prohibits employers from bringing claims against unions that conduct such secondary strikes. The bill also allows collective bargaining agreements to require all employees represented by the bargaining unit to contribute fees to the labor organization for the cost of such representation, notwithstanding a state law to the contrary, and it expands unfair labor practices to include prohibitions against replacement of, or discrimination against, workers who participate in strikes. The bill makes it an unfair labor practice to require or coerce employees to attend employer meetings designed to discourage union membership and prohibits employers from entering into agreements with employees under which employees waive the right to pursue or join collective or class-action litigation. Finally, the bill addresses the procedures for union representation elections, modifies the protections against unfair labor practices that result in serious economic harm, and establishes penalties and permits injunctive relief against entities that fail to comply with National Labor Relations Board orders. - The PRO Act has not yet passed out of committee in the House or Senate. Provisions in the PRO Act would force employers to provide their employees' personal information to labor groups without employee consent, infringe upon a worker's right to a secret ballot in union elections, and take away a worker's ability to work independently, especially in those working in the gig economy. - NACD advocated against the inclusion of elements of the PRO Act in several pieces of legislation. NACD advocated in support of including additional paid sick days in any legislated rail labor legislation moving forward.
  • NACD advocated in support of H.R.3408, the DRIVE Safe Integrity Act of 2023, introduced by Rep. Rick Crawford (R-AR) on May 17, 2023. This bill builds off the pilot program that was included in the 2021 bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. However, that program has been bogged down by extraneous requirements from the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), meaning it has seen fewer than a dozen of the expected 3,000 enrollees. NACD has long support efforts to increase the number of young commercial drives in a safe manner, and has supported similar efforts in previous sessions of Congress. NACD advocated in support of S. 576, the Railway Safety Act of 2023, introduced by Sens. Sherrod Brown (D-OH), J.D. Vance (R-OH), Bob Casey (D-PA), and John Fetterman (D-PA), Marco Rubio (R-FL), and Josh Hawley (R-MO) on March 1, 2023, following the train derailment in East Palestine, OH. NACD also supported and advocated in favor of the House of Representatives companion bill, H.R. 1674, introduced by Reps. Chris Deluzio (D-PA) and Nick LaLota (R-NY) on March 21, 2023. This bill addresses safety requirements for rail carriers and trains transporting hazardous materials. Specifically, the Department of Transportation (DOT) must issue safety regulations for trains carrying hazardous materials to require that rail carriers or shippers (1) provide state emergency response commissioners with advanced notice and information about the hazardous materials; (2) reduce blocked rail crossings; and (3) comply with certain requirements regarding train length and weight specifications, track standards, speed restrictions, and response plans. DOT must also establish requirements for wayside defect detectors. These are used by railway systems alongside the tracks to detect defects and failures (e.g., wheel bearing failures). Current federal regulations do not require their use, but federal guidance does address their placement and use. Under the bill, DOT must issue regulations establishing requirements for the installation, repair, testing, maintenance, and operation of wayside defect detectors for each rail carrier operating a train carrying hazardous materials. The bill also 1)increases the maximum fines DOT may impose on rail carriers for violating safety regulations, 2) requires DOT to update rail car inspection regulations and audit the federal inspection program, 3) requires a minimum two-person crew for certain freight trains, 4) phases out certain railroad tank cars by May 1, 2025 (four years sooner than required under current law), 5) expands training for local first responders, 6) imposes a new fee on certain rail carriers, and 7) provides funding for research and development to improve railway safety. - The Senate bill, S.576, passed out the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation (as an amendment in nature of a substitute) by a vote of 16-11, and now awaits a full Senate vote. - NACD highlighted the numerous ongoing rail safety issues and initiatives to help bolster the bill text. NACD advocated for minor changes to the bill text to ensure provisions help to resolve the actual safety issues the railroads need to address to bolster rail safety. - NACD's concern with this legislation was providing legislative text that ensures the required advanced notices and information about the presence of hazardous materials onboard the rail is kept strictly between those with a need-to-know (i.e. first responders, state emergency response commissioners, state/local authorities), and not the general public. Additionally, the onus of sharing this information be on the rail carrier, and not the shippers, because shippers do not have that information to share. NACD advocated in support of H.R. 1633, the Reducing Accidents in Locomotives (RAIL) Act, introduced by Reps. Bill Johnson (R-OH) and Emilia Strong Sykes (D-OH) in the House of Representatives. This legislation is a bipartisan product that aims to enhance safety requirements for trains transporting hazardous materials. The RAIL Act would improve railway safety and operations by 1) directing the Federal Rail Administration (FRA), in conjunction with the findings of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation, to recommend changes to how our nations rail system operates - from train length, weight to speed, and track standards, 2) increasing funding for Hazardous Materials Training for first responders, 3) increasing maximum penalties for violations of rail safety regulations, 4) increasing inspections on all trains, including those carrying hazardous materials, 5) auditing federal rail inspection programs. No additional action on this bill to-date in the House.
  • Superfund Excise Tax Full or Partial Repeal - Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act reinstatement of the Superfund excise tax led to NACD advocating for full or partial repeal of the Superfund excise tax. Additionally, NACD advocated for Congress to put pressure on the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Department of Treasury to issue additional guidance on the excise tax due to unclear initial guidance that left taxpayers guessing as to what should be taxed. The Superfund Tax on chemicals was sold as a fee on chemicals, but it is really a new tax on consumers. The 42 chemicals identified for taxation are the building blocks for a limitless number of goods, including steel, plastics, wood products, copper, cement, glass, pesticides, fungicides, pharmaceuticals, rubber, paint and coatings, batteries, solar panels, soap and detergents, ceramics, textiles, semiconductors, water treatment, light bulbs, refrigerants, dental fillings, fireworks and consumer electronics. The Superfund Tax on chemicals will also impede the goals of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework by making the components of infrastructure more expensive-including clean energy building blocks such as renewable energy, advanced coatings, energy efficiency solutions and electric vehicle (EV) infrastructure. The Superfund Tax on chemicals will also make U.S. manufacturers less competitive. NACD advocated for full repeal of the Superfund Tax in 2022, as well as partial repeal/exclusion of certain specific chemicals not manufactured in the US. While we awaited more information from the IRS, Congress passed the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022, which reinstated the Hazardous Substance Superfund Financing Tax Rate on Crude Oil and Petroleum Products. The tax will go into effect on January 1, 2023, and will be applied upon importation of the petroleum products. This additional component of the Superfund Tax will have an impact on NACD members, in addition to the initial resurrection of Part 1 of the Superfund Tax. NACD engaged in congressional advocacy to eliminate or limit the scope of the Superfund tax, including working with representatives and senators to send letters to Treasury/IRS, and educating offices on key committees about our compliance challenges. The Generalized System of Preferences (GSP), a tariff relief program, expired on December 31, 2020. The GSP, established by the Trade Act of 1974, provides duty relief on products from participating developing countries to promote economic development. NACD supports either a short-term renewal with a clean extension of the program while negotiations continue or a long-term retroactive renewal of GSP. Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB) - The Miscellaneous Tariff Bill, also a tariff relief program, expired on December 31, 2020. The MTB is a trade program facilitated by the U.S. International Trade Commission that provides duty relief on imports that cannot be domestically produced. NACD supported the retroactive renewal of the MTB. China Section 301 tariffs - USTR has implemented three China import tariff lists. List 1 and 2 remain in effect, and List 3 has been projected to go from 10% to 25%. NACD supports legislation to remove these import tariffs.

Duration: to

May Have Ended?

General Issues: Environmental/Superfund, Chemicals/Chemical Industry, Transportation, Trade (Domestic & Foreign), Miscellaneous Tariff Bills, Homeland Security, Labor Issues/Antitrust/Workplace, Roads/Highway, Trucking/Shipping, Taxation/Internal Revenue Code, Unemployment, Health Issues, Small Business, Defense, Food Industry (Safety, Labeling, etc.), Clean Air & Water (Quality), Railroads, Fuel/Gas/Oil, Government Issues, Budget/Appropriations, Consumer Issues/Safety/Protection, Energy/Nuclear, Civil Rights/Civil Liberties

Spending: about $1,958,698 (But it's complicated. Here's why.)

Agencies lobbied since 2007: U.S. Senate, House of Representatives, Surface Transportation Board (STB), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Homeland Security - Dept of (DHS), Pipeline & Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, Transportation - Dept of (DOT), Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA), President of the U.S., House of Representatives,, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, White House Office, U.S. Senate,, Natl Labor Relations Board (NLRB), Labor - Dept of (DOL), Y Y U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Y Y U.S. Department of Transporation - Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration U.S. Department of Homeland Security - Transportation Security Administration, Y Y

Bills mentioned

S.951: Regulatory Accountability Act of 2017

Sponsor: Rob Portman (R-Ohio)

S.580: Truth in Regulations Act of 2017

Sponsor: James Lankford (R-Okla.)

S.584: Small Business Regulatory Flexibility Improvements Act

Sponsor: James Lankford (R-Okla.)

H.R.3354: Interior and Environment, Agriculture and Rural Development, Commerce,...

Sponsor: Ken Calvert (R-Calif.)

H.R.2576: Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act

Sponsor: John Shimkus (R-Ill.)

S.697: Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act

Sponsor: Tom Udall (D-N.M.)

S.1014: Personal Care Products Safety Act

Sponsor: Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.)

S.808: Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2015

Sponsor: John Thune (R-S.D.)

S.1298: Port Performance Act

Sponsor: John Thune (R-S.D.)

S.88: General Duty Clarification Act of 2015

Sponsor: David Vitter (R-La.)

S.1009: Chemical Safety Improvement Act

Sponsor: Frank R. Lautenberg (D-N.J.)

H.R.4007: Protecting and Securing Chemical Facilities from Terrorist Attacks Act...

Sponsor: Pat Meehan (R-Pa.)

H.R.5021: Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2014

Sponsor: Dave Camp (R-Mich.)

S.2777: Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2014

Sponsor: John D. Rockefeller IV (D-W.Va.)

H.R.888: General Duty Clarification Act of 2013

Sponsor: Mike Pompeo (R-Kan.)

S.1961: Chemical Safety and Drinking Water Protection Act of 2014

Sponsor: Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.)

H.R.4024: Ensuring Access to Clean Water Act of 2014

Sponsor: Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.)

H.R.4745: Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies...

Sponsor: Tom Latham (R-Iowa)

S.2438: Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies...

Sponsor: Patty Murray (D-Wash.)

S.847: Polar Bear Conservation and Fairness Act of 2013

Sponsor: Michael D. Crapo (R-Idaho)

H.R.367: Regulations From the Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act of 2013

Sponsor: Todd Young (R-Ind.)

S.847: Safe Chemicals Act of 2011

Sponsor: Frank R. Lautenberg (D-N.J.)

H.R.6345: General Duty Clarification Act of 2012

Sponsor: Mike Pompeo (R-Kan.)

S.3529: General Duty Clarification Act of 2012

Sponsor: Pat Roberts (R-Kan.)

H.R.4078: Red Tape Reduction and Small Business Job Creation Act

Sponsor: Tim Griffin (R-Ark.)

H.R.901: Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Security Authorization Act of 2011

Sponsor: Dan Lungren (R-Calif.)

H.R.908: Full Implementation of the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Act

Sponsor: Tim Murphy (R-Pa.)

S.709: Secure Chemical Facilities Act

Sponsor: Frank R. Lautenberg (D-N.J.)

S.3240: Agriculture Reform, Food, and Jobs Act of 2012

Sponsor: Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.)

H.R.7: American Energy and Infrastructure Jobs Act of 2012

Sponsor: John L. Mica (R-Fla.)

S.299: REINS Act

Sponsor: Rand Paul (R-Ky.)

H.R.10: Regulations From the Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act of 2011

Sponsor: Geoff Davis (R-Ky.)

H.R.3010: Regulatory Accountability Act of 2011

Sponsor: Lamar Smith (R-Texas)

S.1100: Keeping Politics Out of Federal Contracting Act of 2011

Sponsor: Susan Collins (R-Maine)

H.R.2008: Keeping Politics Out of Federal Contracting Act of 2011

Sponsor: Darrell Issa (R-Calif.)

S.2219: DISCLOSE Act of 2012

Sponsor: Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.)

S.1789: 21st Century Postal Service Act of 2012

Sponsor: Joseph I. Lieberman (I-Conn.)

S.J.RES.36: A joint resolution providing for congressional disapproval under chapter...

Sponsor: Michael B. Enzi (R-Wyo.)

H.R.3863: Fair Military Leave Act

Sponsor: Ron Kind (D-Wis.)

H.R.3630: Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012

Sponsor: Dave Camp (R-Mich.)

H.J.RES.103: Providing for congressional disapproval under chapter 8 of title 5,...

Sponsor: Phil Gingrey (R-Ga.)

H.R.763: Safe and Efficient Transportation Act of 2011

Sponsor: Michael H. Michaud (D-Maine)

S.747: Safe and Efficient Transportation Act of 2011

Sponsor: Michael D. Crapo (R-Idaho)

H.R.872: Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act of 2011

Sponsor: Bob Gibbs (R-Ohio)

H.R.3094: Workforce Democracy and Fairness Act

Sponsor: John Kline (R-Minn.)

H.R.3070: Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and...

Sponsor: Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.)

S.1596: Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies...

Sponsor: Patty Murray (D-Wash.)

H.R.2584: Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies...

Sponsor: Mike Simpson (R-Idaho)

H.R.2401: Transparency in Regulatory Analysis of Impacts on the Nation Act of 2011

Sponsor: John Sullivan (R-Okla.)

S.473: Continuing Chemical Facilities Antiterrorism Security Act of 2011

Sponsor: Susan Collins (R-Maine)

S.49: Railroad Antitrust Enforcement Act of 2011

Sponsor: Herb Kohl (D-Wis.)

S.158: Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2011

Sponsor: John D. Rockefeller IV (D-W.Va.)

H.R.910: Energy Tax Prevention Act of 2011

Sponsor: Fred Upton (R-Mich.)

S.493: SBIR/STTR Reauthorization Act of 2011

Sponsor: Mary L. Landrieu (D-La.)

H.R.1976: Job Protection Act

Sponsor: Tim Scott (R-S.C.)

S.964: Job Protection Act

Sponsor: Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.)

S.1253: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012

Sponsor: Carl Levin (D-Mich.)

H.R.916: Continuing Chemical Facilities Antiterrorism Security Act of 2011

Sponsor: Charlie Dent (R-Pa.)

H.R.2: Repealing the Job-Killing Health Care Law Act

Sponsor: Eric Cantor (R-Va.)

H.R.4: Comprehensive 1099 Taxpayer Protection and Repayment of Exchange Subsidy...

Sponsor: Dan Lungren (R-Calif.)

H.R.2868: Continuing Chemical Facilities Antiterrorism Security Act of 2010

Sponsor: Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.)

S.2996: Continuing Chemical Facilities Antiterrorism Security Act of 2010

Sponsor: Susan Collins (R-Maine)

S.3599: Secure Chemical Facilities Act

Sponsor: Frank R. Lautenberg (D-N.J.)

H.R.5820: Toxic Chemicals Safety Act of 2010

Sponsor: Bobby L. Rush (D-Ill.)

S.3209: Safe Chemicals Act of 2010

Sponsor: Frank R. Lautenberg (D-N.J.)

H.R.5663: Robert C. Byrd Miner Safety and Health Act of 2010

Sponsor: George Miller (D-Calif.)

H.R.4753: Stationary Source Regulations Delay Act

Sponsor: Nick J. Rahall II (D-W.Va.)

S.3072: Stationary Source Regulations Delay Act

Sponsor: John D. Rockefeller IV (D-W.Va.)

H.R.4016: Hazardous Material Transportation Safety Act of 2009

Sponsor: James L. Oberstar (D-Minn.)

S.2889: Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2009

Sponsor: John D. Rockefeller IV (D-W.Va.)

H.R.233: Railroad Antitrust Enforcement Act of 2009

Sponsor: Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.)

S.560: Employee Free Choice Act of 2009

Sponsor: Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.)

H.R.1409: Employee Free Choice Act of 2009

Sponsor: George Miller (D-Calif.)

H.R.3590: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Sponsor: Charles B. Rangel (D-N.Y.)

H.R.4872: Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010

Sponsor: John M. Spratt Jr. (D-S.C.)

H.R.5175: DISCLOSE Act

Sponsor: Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.)

H.R.2477: Chemical Facility Security Authorization Act of 2009

Sponsor: Charlie Dent (R-Pa.)

H.R.832: Superfund Polluter Pays Act

Sponsor: Frank Pallone (D-N.J.)

H.R.564: Superfund Reinvestment Act of 2009

Sponsor: Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.)

H.R.1613: Made in America Act of 2009

Sponsor: Christopher Carney (D-Pa.)

S.146: Railroad Antitrust Enforcement Act of 2009

Sponsor: Herb Kohl (D-Wis.)

H.R.2454: American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009

Sponsor: Henry A. Waxman (D-Calif.)

H.R.3200: America's Affordable Health Choices Act of 2009

Sponsor: John D. Dingell (D-Mich.)

H.R.2200: Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act

Sponsor: Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas)

H.R.5577: Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Act of 2008

Sponsor: Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.)

H.R.5533: Chemical Facilities Security Act of 2008

Sponsor: Albert Russell Wynn (D-Md.)

S.772: Railroad Antitrust Enforcement Act of 2007

Sponsor: Herb Kohl (D-Wis.)

S.953: Railroad Competition and Service Improvement Act of 2007

Sponsor: John D. Rockefeller IV (D-W.Va.)

H.R.2125: Railroad Competition and Service Improvement Act of 2007

Sponsor: James L. Oberstar (D-Minn.)

S.3040: Kid-Safe Chemicals Act of 2008

Sponsor: Frank R. Lautenberg (D-N.J.)

S.41: Research Competitiveness Act of 2007

Sponsor: Max Baucus (D-Mont.)

S.2209: Research Credit Improvement Act of 2007

Sponsor: Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah)

H.R.1712: Research and Development Tax Credit Act of 2007

Sponsor: Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-Texas)

H.R.2138: Investment in America Act of 2007

Sponsor: Sander M. Levin (D-Mich.)

H.R.5915: Screening Applied Fairly and Equitably to Truckers Act of 2008

Sponsor: Dan Lungren (R-Calif.)

H.R.6100: Kid-Safe Chemicals Act of 2008

Sponsor: Hilda L. Solis (D-Calif.)

S.2795: Small Business Health Options Program Act of 2008

Sponsor: Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.)

H.R.1650: Railroad Antitrust Enforcement Act of 2008

Sponsor: Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.)

S.1889: Railroad Safety Enhancement Act of 2007

Sponsor: Frank R. Lautenberg (D-N.J.)

H.R.1591: U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans' Care, Katrina Recovery, and Iraq...

Sponsor: David R. Obey (D-Wis.)

H.R.2638: Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, and Continuing...

Sponsor: David E. Price (D-N.C.)

H.R.1530: Chemical Facility Security Improvement Act of 2007

Sponsor: Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas)

H.R.1574: Safe Facilities Act

Sponsor: Christopher H. Smith (R-N.J.)

H.R.1633: To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to prohibit the Secretary of...

Sponsor: Steven R. Rothman (D-N.J.)

S.4: Improving America's Security Act of 2007

Sponsor: Harry Reid (D-Nev.)

S.184: Surface Transportation and Rail Security Act of 2007

Sponsor: Daniel K. Inouye (D-Hawaii)

H.R.1401: Rail and Public Transportation Security Act of 2007

Sponsor: Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.)

H.R.2095: Railroad Safety Enhancement Act of 2008

Sponsor: James L. Oberstar (D-Minn.)

S.1438: Railroad Crossing and Hazardous Materials Transport Safety Act of 2007

Sponsor: Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)

H.R.800: Employee Free Choice Act of 2007

Sponsor: George Miller (D-Calif.)

H.R.1: An Act to provide for reconciliation pursuant to titles II and V of the...

Sponsor: Kevin Brady (R-Texas)

H.R.5729: Transportation Worker Identification Credential Accountability Act of 2018

Sponsor: John Katko (R-N.Y.)

S.3094: Transportation Worker Identification Credential Accountability Act of 2018

Sponsor: Dan Sullivan (R-Alaska)

H.R.5358: DRIVE-Safe Act

Sponsor: Duncan D. Hunter (R-Calif.)

S.3013: A bill to amend the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 to require Congressional...

Sponsor: Bob Corker (R-Tenn.)

S.3405: Protecting and Securing Chemical Facilities from Terrorist Attacks Act...

Sponsor: Ron Johnson (R-Wis.)

H.R.6992: Protecting and Securing Chemical Facilities from Terrorist Attacks Act...

Sponsor: John Katko (R-N.Y.)

S.3352: DRIVE-Safe Act

Sponsor: Todd Young (R-Ind.)

H.R.4318: Miscellaneous Tariff Bill Act of 2018

Sponsor: Kevin Brady (R-Texas)

S.2108: Miscellaneous Tariff Bill Act of 2017

Sponsor: Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah)

H.R.535: PFAS Action Act of 2019

Sponsor: Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.)

S.638: PFAS Action Act of 2019

Sponsor: Thomas R. Carper (D-Del.)

S.950: PFAS Detection Act of 2019

Sponsor: Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.)

H.R.1976: PFAS Detection Act of 2019

Sponsor: Dan Kildee (D-Mich.)

S.1105: PFAS Registry Act of 2019

Sponsor: Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.)

H.R.2195: PFAS Registry Act of 2019

Sponsor: Chris Pappas (D-N.H.)

S.675: Prompt and Fast Action to Stop Damages Act of 2019

Sponsor: Tom Udall (D-N.M.)

H.R.1567: Prompt and Fast Action to Stop Damages Act of 2019

Sponsor: Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.)

H.R.1152: To require the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency to...

Sponsor: Brad Schneider (D-Ill.)

S.458: A bill to require the Administrator of the Environmental Protection...

Sponsor: Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.)

H.R.251: Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Program Extension Act

Sponsor: Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.)

S.808: ALERT Act

Sponsor: Gary Peters (D-Mich.)

H.R.1374: DRIVE-Safe Act

Sponsor: Trey Hollingsworth (R-Ind.)

S.569: DRIVE-Safe Act

Sponsor: Todd Young (R-Ind.)

H.R.1452: Import Tax Relief Act of 2019

Sponsor: Ron Kind (D-Wis.)

S.577: Import Tax Relief Act of 2019

Sponsor: James Lankford (R-Okla.)

H.R.940: Bicameral Congressional Trade Authority Act of 2019

Sponsor: Mike Gallagher (R-Wis.)

S.287: Bicameral Congressional Trade Authority Act of 2019

Sponsor: Patrick J. Toomey (R-Pa.)

H.R.1165: ETO is Toxic Act

Sponsor: Bill Foster (D-Ill.)

S.451: Expanding Transparency of Information and Safeguarding Toxics (EtO is...

Sponsor: Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.)

S.1507: PFAS Release Disclosure and Protection Act of 2019

Sponsor: Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.)

S.1790: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020

Sponsor: James M. Inhofe (R-Okla.)

H.R.2500: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020

Sponsor: Adam Smith (D-Wash.)

H.R.3256: Protecting and Securing Chemical Facilities from Terrorist Attacks Act...

Sponsor: Cedric Richmond (D-La.)

S.899: Reclaiming Congressional Trade Authority Act of 2019

Sponsor: Tim Kaine (D-Va.)

H.R.3477: Reclaiming Congressional Trade Authority Act of 2019

Sponsor: Stephanie Murphy (D-Fla.)

H.R.3719: CTPAT Reauthorization Act of 2019

Sponsor: Clay Higgins (R-La.)

H.R.397: Rehabilitation for Multiemployer Pensions Act of 2019

Sponsor: Richard E. Neal (D-Mass.)

H.R.4069: Modern Worker Empowerment Act

Sponsor: Elise Stefanik (R-N.Y.)

H.R.2474: Protecting the Right to Organize Act of 2019

Sponsor: Robert C. Scott (D-Va.)

S.1306: Protecting the Right to Organize Act of 2019

Sponsor: Patty Murray (D-Wash.)

S.3416: Protecting and Securing Chemical Facilities from Terrorist Attacks Act...

Sponsor: Ron Johnson (R-Wis.)

H.R.748: CARES Act

Sponsor: Joe Courtney (D-Conn.)

S.4096: A bill to extend the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Program...

Sponsor: Ron Johnson (R-Wis.)

H.R.2: Moving Forward Act

Sponsor: Peter A. DeFazio (D-Ore.)

S.4117: Paycheck Protection Small Business Forgiveness Act

Sponsor: Kevin Cramer (R-N.D.)

H.R.6754: Protecting the Paycheck Protection Program Act of 2020

Sponsor: Lizzie Fletcher (D-Texas)

S.3612: Small Business Expense Protection Act of 2020

Sponsor: John Cornyn (R-Texas)

S.4784: A bill to extend the Generalized System of Preferences, and for other...

Sponsor: Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa)

H.R.8884: To amend the Trade Act of 1974 to modify and extend the Generalized...

Sponsor: Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.)

S.1121: PFAS Registry Act of 2021

Sponsor: Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.)

H.R.3291: Assistance, Quality, and Affordability Act of 2021

Sponsor: Paul Tonko (D-N.Y.)

S.916: Water Affordability, Transparency, Equity, and Reliability Act of 2021

Sponsor: Bernard Sanders (ID-Vt.)

H.R.1352: Water Affordability, Transparency, Equity, and Reliability Act of 2021

Sponsor: Brenda Lawrence (D-Mich.)

H.R.1512: CLEAN Future Act

Sponsor: Frank Pallone (D-N.J.)

H.R.314: Communities and Environment First Act of 2021

Sponsor: Cedric Richmond (D-La.)

S.984: Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act of 2021

Sponsor: Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.)

H.R.1745: Developing Responsible Individuals for a Vibrant Economy Act

Sponsor: Trey Hollingsworth (R-Ind.)

S.659: DRIVE Safe Act

Sponsor: Todd Young (R-Ind.)

H.R.2467: PFAS Action Act of 2021

Sponsor: Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.)

H.R.2: Reserved for the Speaker.

Sponsor: none

S.1260: United States Innovation and Competition Act of 2021

Sponsor: Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)

H.R.4037: Trade Preferences and American Manufacturing Competitiveness Act of 2021

Sponsor: Kevin Brady (R-Texas)

H.R.3975: Generalized System of Preferences and Miscellaneous Tariff Bill...

Sponsor: Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.)

H.R.3684: Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act

Sponsor: Peter A. DeFazio (D-Ore.)

H.R.4996: Ocean Shipping Reform Act of 2021

Sponsor: John Garamendi (D-Calif.)

S.420: Protecting the Right to Organize Act of 2021

Sponsor: Patty Murray (D-Wash.)

H.R.842: Protecting the Right to Organize Act of 2021

Sponsor: Robert C. Scott (D-Va.)

S.3580: Ocean Shipping Reform Act of 2022

Sponsor: Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.)

S.576: Railway Safety Act of 2023

Sponsor: Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio)

H.R.1674: Railway Safety Act of 2023

Sponsor: Chris Deluzio (D-Pa.)

H.R.1633: RAIL Act

Sponsor: Bill Johnson (R-Ohio)

H.R.20: Richard L. Trumka Protecting the Right to Organize Act of 2023

Sponsor: Robert C. Scott (D-Va.)

S.567: Richard L. Trumka Protecting the Right to Organize Act of 2023

Sponsor: Bernard Sanders (ID-Vt.)

H.R.3408: DRIVE Safe Integrity Act of 2023

Sponsor: Rick Crawford (R-Ark.)

Show All Mentioned Bills

Lobbyists

Lobbyists named here were listed on a filing related to this lobbying engagement. They may not be working on it now. Occasionally, a single lobbyist whose name is spelled two different ways on filings may be represented twice here.

Lobbyist Covered positions?
John Shanahan Special Asst to Asst Secty, DOL Senior Counsel, U.S. Senate Spec Asst to the Asst Sect'y, DOL Sr. Counsel, U.S. Senate Spec Asst to the Asst. Sect'y, DOL Special Asst to the Asst Sect'y, DOL Spec'l Asst to Asst Sect'y, DOL / Counsel, U.S. Senate Spc'l Asst to Asst Sect'y, DOL / Counsel, U.S. Senate Spec'l Asst to Asst Sect'y / Counsel, U.S. Senate Special Assistant to the Assistant Secretary, DOL Special Asst. to the Asst. Sect'y, DOL Special Asst to Asst Sect'y, DOL Spec. Asst to the Asst Sect'y, DOL Sr. counsel, U.S. Senate Sr. Counsel, US Senate Special Asst to the Asst Secty, DOL Spec'l Asst to Asst Sect'y, DOL/US Senate Counsel Spec'l Asst to Asst Sect'y / US Senate Counsel Spec'l Asst to Asst Sect'y, DOL / US Senate Counse
Ben Traynham n/a
Eric Byer n/a
Laura Chambers n/a
Lindsay Ryan n/a
Douglas Leigh n/a
Layla Soberanis n/a
Benjamin Traynham n/a
Doug Leigh n/a
Theresa Forbes n/a
b Traynham n/a
Jennifer Gibson n/a
Amanda Gunasekara n/a
C. Elizabeth O'Neal n/a
Elizabeth O'Neal n/a
Elizabeth O'Neale n/a
Joseph Stanton n/a
Chris Parinello n/a
Conrad Schatte n/a
Jennifer C. Gibson n/a
Douglas Leigh III n/a
Jack Detiveaux n/a
Doug Leigh III n/a
Erin Getz n/a
Brian Callahan n/a

Disclosures Filed

Once a lobbying engagement begins, the lobbyist or firm is required to file updates four times a year. Those updates sometimes change which lobbyists are involved or add new issues being discussed. When lobbyists stop working for a client, the firm is also supposed to file a report disclosing the end of the relationship.

This representation may have ended. No reports have been filed in the past 160 days, though termination paperwork has not been released.

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